Tag Archives: Compound nouns

Phrasal verbs for business: F

to face up to to accept something unpleasant: We’re going to have to face up to the fact that we’ve just lost our biggest client. to fall back on to use in an emergency: If this plan doesn’t work we’ll … Continue reading

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Phrasal verbs for business: D

to deal in to do business: John deals in timber. He’s got big business interests in Siberia. to deal with to be about something: The article deals with various tax and foreign exchange issues. to take action with regard to … Continue reading

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Phrasal verbs for Business: C

to call (something) off to cancel something: Bob is ill, so we’ll have to call off the meeting. to cancel (something) out to have an opposite effect, causing a return to the original situation: The new tax cancels out the … Continue reading

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Phrasal verbs for business: B

Phrasal verbs that include (someone) or (something) are separable. Others cannot be separated, so the object must come after the entire phrasal verb. to back (someone) up to give someone help and support: My old boss would always back me … Continue reading

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The difference between Shareholders’ meeting and Shareholders meeting

Do you add the apostrophe to Shareholders’ meeting? Or do you prefer Shareholders meeting, without the apostrophe? Both are in fact correct. It may seem like a very small point, but misunderstanding the underlying grammar is the source of some … Continue reading

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How to pluralise terms made up of more than one word

As you know, in English you generally make a word plural by adding an ‘s’ at the end. There seems to be some confusion, though, about how to make plurals of terms made up of more than one word. For … Continue reading

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The difference between “hand over” and “handover”

The difference is that “hand over” is a verb and “handover” is a noun. To be precise, “hand over” is a phrasal verb and “handover” is a compound noun. So we say: He handed over the money on Saturday. And: … Continue reading

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