Tag Archives: British/US English

How to use commas

Following up on the previous post, here’s more on how to use commas in English. There are 4 different kinds of comma. I will look at each in a separate post. 1. Listing comma 2. Joining comma 3. Gapping comma … Continue reading

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How to use apostrophes

An apostrophe is one of these: ’ It is NOT one of these: ‘ That is an inverted comma (or quotation mark/speech mark), which is used for opening quotations.  ’ is also used to close a quotation, in which case … Continue reading

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How to use the word “holiday”

WRONG I am currently on holidays. He is on his holidays now and will be returning to the office next week. RIGHT I am currently on holiday. He is on holiday now and will be returning to the office next … Continue reading

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How to talk on the phone

Here are a few examples of phrases commonly used in telephone conversations. Obviously the people’s names and the company name are invented. Introducing yourself If an assistant answers the phone: They say: Good morning, Company X, How can I help you? … Continue reading

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The difference between “in future” and “in the future”

Consider these examples: You should be more careful in future. In the future we plan to make significant investments in Romania and Bulgaria. In the first example “in future” means “from now on and always”. It is often used in … Continue reading

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Differences between British and American English

When you write in English you should decide whether to use British or American. Some companies have a policy about this, but many do not. Either way, you should aim to be consistent throughout a piece of writing. The table … Continue reading

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The difference between “milliard” and “billion”

In English, a “billion” is 1 000 000 000 (a thousand million). This has always been the case in US English. In British English, in the past the word “billion” meant a million million. If we wanted to refer to a thousand … Continue reading

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