Author Archives: barnabyharward

The difference between “in possession of” and “in the possession of”

Somebody is in possession of something. Something is in the possession of somebody. So for example: The passenger was in possession of a very large dog. A very large dog was in the possession of the passenger. Mistakes can sound … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

How to use “worth”

WRONG It might not work, but I think that in our current circumstances it is worth to try. Using the structure “worth to do something” is a very common mistake. It is ALWAYS WRONG. RIGHT It might not work, but … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Whether (or not)

WRONG We must decide by the end of the month whether or not we’re going to do it. This is an example of a very common mistake. In this sentence “or not” is unnecessary. RIGHT We must decide by the … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Pairing adverbs and adjectives

Have a look at this sentence: I have noticed that paragraphs 81 and 82 are virtually similar to paragraphs 5 and 6. “Virtually similar” is incorrect because “virtually” is a non-grading adverb and “similar” is a gradable adjective. “Very similar” … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The difference between “currently” and “presently”

Many people – native English speakers included – are confused by the word “presently”. In UK English it has traditionally been a formal, literary word which means “in a short time”, “soon” or “before long” – in contrast to “currently”, … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

How to translate “termin” (time expression)

The Polish word “termin” can mean a period of time or a point in time. In English, the word “term” can also mean a period of time or a point in time. But “term” has very specific uses (relating to … Continue reading

Posted in Dla Polaków | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The difference between “practice” and “practise”

In British English – like “licence/license” and “advice/advise” – “practice” is a NOUN and “practise” is a VERB: NOUN Safeguarding clients’ personal data should be standard practice in the company. He has been a lawyer for many years, but he … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 1 Comment