Tag Archives: Idioms

“Prepare for” or “prepare to”?

WRONG She spent three hours preparing to the court hearing. RIGHT She spent three hours preparing for the court hearing. This is a very common mistake. But “prepare” is not always followed by “for”. Sometimes “to” is correct. The rule … Continue reading

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How to use “provided that”

The phrase “provided that” has numerous possible meanings, which can result in ambiguity if it is not used properly.   First of all, “provided that” can simply be a verb + conjunction combination. This is a common structure in legal … Continue reading

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The difference between “arrange” and “arrange for”

We use “arrange for” when we talk about making arrangements, often when we ask someone else to deal with something, e.g.: Please arrange for the issuance of a new invoice. (I don’t expect you to do it yourself – ask … Continue reading

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The difference between “in case” and “in the case”

“In the case” means “if”. For example: In the case the Lessee fails to undertake reparations within this period, the Lessor may terminate the Lease. = If the Lessee fails to undertake reparations… You may also use this phrase with … Continue reading

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How to use the word “account” (part 2)

Meanings of “account” As I said in the previous post, the word “account” can mean a variety of things. Below is a list of common meanings and uses of the word. As a noun a bank account a record of … Continue reading

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How to use the word “account” (part 1)

The word “account” can mean a variety of things, depending on the context in which it is used. It also has many idiomatic uses. As a result, if not used with great care, the word can cause ambiguity and make … Continue reading

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