How to use “remind” and “invite”

This post follows from my previous post on “inform” and “notify”.

In the same way as “inform” and “notify” require two objects, so do “remind” and “invite”. You must “remind somebody about something” and “invite somebody to something”. It is incorrect in English to use these verbs and omit somebody.

WRONG
We would like to remind that Mr Smith signed the statement on behalf on the Claimant.

We have the honour to invite to a meeting with the Deputy Secretary General of the ICC.

RIGHT
We would like to remind you that Mr Smith signed the statement on behalf on the Claimant.

We have the honour to invite you to a meeting with the Deputy Secretary General of the ICC.

As with “inform” and “notify”, if you do not want to include somebody in the sentence (i.e. there is no indirect object) you have to use different words:

Instead of “remind” – reiterate, repeat, point out, stress, emphasize
Instead of “invite” – present, host (e.g. We have the honour to host a meeting with the Deputy Secretary General of the ICC.)

And finally…

The phrase “Please be reminded that…” is rarely used by native English speakers. It is certainly too formal for emails. Instead use “I would like to remind you that…” or “Please remember that…

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